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Degree of Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

Students are accepted under the general regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applications must be submitted through the School of Graduate Studies online application website. Their dossier must include the following documents: one copy of the official transcript in a sealed envelope, two academic letters of recommendation, a specimen of written work in French done as part of the undergraduate degree and a Letter of Intent in French indicating whether they intend the M.A. to be a final degree or whether they intend to proceed subsequently to the Ph.D. They must also meet the following requirements:

  1. An appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university (B+ average standing or better, with at least B+ in French).
  2. Linguistic competence in French.
  3. Concentration in French literature and/or linguistics [a minimum of seven full courses, or equivalent, in French]. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e. literature or linguistics).

A B+ average does not automatically lead to admission. Each dossier is studied by the Admissions Committee, which takes into account all relevant factors.

The Department may offer direct admission (from the B.A.) to a PhD program to exceptionally qualified applicants.

Program Requirements

The M.A. program is both a self-contained program and the first stage towards doctoral studies. It has two objectives: to allow the student to develop a thorough knowledge of the discipline through a program of course work in literary studies or linguistics; to develop an aptitude for research. It is a twelve-month program. At the beginning of his/her course of study the student will meet with either the Associate Chair or Coordinator, Graduate Admissions and Funding, in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, taken in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.

  • Prerequisite work, if necessary.
  • Students in both literature and linguistics are required to complete four full-course equivalents as follows:
    • Students in literature take the three graduate seminars in literature (FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, and FRE 1204H) and
      • 2.5 full-course equivalents from the regular graduate course offerings or
      • 2.0 full-course equivalents and a half-course Research Essay FRE 5001H, a mémoire of approximately 35 pages, or
      • 1.5 full-course equivalents and a full-course Research Essay FRE 5000Y, a 65-75 page mémoire.
    • Students in linguistics take the graduate seminars in linguistics (FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, and FRE 1141H) and
      • 2.5 full-course equivalents from the regular graduate offerings or
      • 2.0 full-course equivalents and a half-course Research Essay FRE 5001H, a mémoire of approximately 35 pages or
      • 1.5 full-course equivalents and a full-course Research Essay FRE 5000Y, a 65-75 page mémoire.
  • Students must maintain a B average in order to be recommended for the degree and must obtain a minimum of mid-B in the Research essay if taken. Students must also obtain a minimum of mid-B for the graduate seminars in literature (FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, and FRE 1204H) or the graduate seminars in linguistics (FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, and FRE 1141H).
  • In exceptional circumstances only, and with the permission of the Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, the student may take up to one full-course equivalent outside the Department. Any student wishing to take a course outside the Department must make an appointment with the Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, to discuss this matter in person.
  • Normally, part-time students take the graduate seminar in literature or the graduate seminars in linguistics during the first year of their programs.

Essays for half-courses are to be between 3500 and 5000 words in length.

Description of the Research Essay

Organization
  1. The student enrols in FRE 5000Y or FRE 5001H in September as part of the regular enrolment procedure. Students doing the program parttime should not enrol in these courses until they have completed at least two full courses (or the equivalent). Parttime students will normally take the graduate seminars in the first year of their program; they would not undertake the Research Essay before having begun the graduate seminars.
  2. Choice of Topic. Students may consult the Graduate Coordinator about potential directors. By January 31 the student should have arranged a topic with a director and registered the topic with the Department.
  3. The Research Essay is independent of any course the student is taking, but it may treat a topic related to one or more of those courses. Whatever its relation to course work, it will not replace the assignment(s) in any course. A student could, for example, take a halfcourse in Molière and write the Research Essay on Molière; s/he would do the regular assignments in the halfcourse and write the Research Essay in addition to the course work. In the preparation of the Research Essay, students are free to consult instructors as needed, and may review together a reasonable number of outlines and preliminary drafts. But once submitted, versions of written work are considered definitive and therefore not subject to rewriting and remarking.

    NOTE: The bibliographic assignment in the graduate seminar may be in the area of the intended Research Essay.
  4. The Research Essay will be written in French and be approximately 65-75 typed pages in length for FRE 5000Y or 35 pages for FRE 5001H. It will be read by the director and at least one other person chosen by the director. In the case of disagreement in the evaluation by the two readers the Graduate Coordinator will name a third reader.  Students must obtain a minimum of mid-B in the Research Essay to be recommended for the degree.

Students should consult with the Department for further details on the supervision of the Research Essay.

A copy of the Research Essay is to be filed with the Graduate Coordinator.

 

Revue Arborescences

Considérant que rien de ce qui touche la langue française ne lui est étranger, la revue Arborescences se veut un espace de réflexion sur les enjeux actuels des études françaises aussi bien en littérature, en linguistique qu’en didactique.

History of the Department

French Studies at the University of Toronto 1853-1993