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Curiosity in the Early Modern Period: Words, Sounds and Objects

Friday, April 6, 2018

Curiosity in the Early Modern Period: Words, Sounds and Objects


Organized by John Haines and Grégoire Holtz


April 6, Goldring Student Center, Victoria College


 


Foreword by Matt Kavaler (Director, CRRS): 9.00


Introduction by John Haines and Grégoire Holtz


Session 1 The Experience of Curiosity: 9: 15 – 10:15


Camelia Sararu (University of Toronto, Department of French): “‘Pure’ Versus Utilitarian Curiosity in Seventeenth-Century French Travel Accounts to the Middle East, Persia and India”


Oana Baboi (University of Toronto, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science) : “ Crustaceans, crosses, and cures”


Plenary Talk– 10.15 – 11. 00


Myriam Marrache-Gouraud (University of West Brittany in Brest): “Cabinet, Museum, Treasury... Common Names for Uncommon Places”


Coffee break 11:00-11:15


Session 2 The Storage of Curiosity: 11:15-12:15


Jean-Olivier Richard (University of Toronto, St Michael College, Christianity and Culture: Christianity and Science): “How to Become a Curiosity: Life and Afterlife of Père Castel”


Myron McShane (University of Toronto, Department of French): “The Delights and Limits of Curiosity: Gemstones and Pillars in a French Renaissance Commentary on Poetic Geography”


 


Session 3: The Outer Limits of Curiosity: 2:00–3:00


Leslie Wexler (University of Toronto, Department of English): “Curious Critters: Insects in Shakespeare”


Paul Harrison (University of Toronto, English): “The Early Modern Desire to Know Everything”


Coffee break 3:00-3:15


 


Session 4: The Sounds of Curiosity: 3:15-4:30


John McClelland (University of Toronto, Department of French): “Curiosity Incarnated: Pontus de Tyard’s Curieux


John Haines (University of Toronto, Faculty of Music): “ Musical Curiosities at the Canadian Museum of History”

 

June
Juin
2018

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